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Detroit Land Use and Zoning

The City of Detroit’s zoning code is one of the largest and most complicated in the nation. It includes more than 800 pages of regulations, zoning district maps and other information related to every aspect of permissible land development in the city.

The land use and zoning attorneys of Dalton & Tomich, PLC combine vast experience in counseling entrepreneurs in their business needs with an intricate knowledge of Detroit’s zoning code, which makes us uniquely prepared to guide you through this important step in operating a Detroit business.

If you are an entrepreneur looking to open a restaurant, a retail store, office space or any other type of business in the City of Detroit, it is extremely important that you fully understand how the City’s zoning code applies to your proposed use before you sign your lease.

From reviewing the particular zoning district to make sure your use is permitted, to identifying the parking needs and requirements, to the need for signage and a review of the historic regulations, the Detroit code covers it all.

For more information on the zoning considerations for opening a business in Detroit, including communicating with city officials, parking requirements, signage requirements, approved vs. conditional uses and variance or rezoning processes, read our blog on 5 Things You Need to Know About Zoning in Detroit.

We can help you meet your goals.

The attorneys of Dalton & Tomich, PLC have the experience and the knowledge to work with you to develop a legal solution that helps you accomplish your goals.

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Frequently Asked Questions:

At a minimum, you should consider the zoning designation of the property. If your proposed use is permitted in the zoning district, consider the historic designation of a building (if applicable), the parking requirements and the need for signage.

Yes, our offices are in the heart of downtown Detroit in the historic Chrysler House. This location is ideal for meeting the needs of our Detroit-based clients.

You have several options. First, you can go back to the drawing board and prepare a new site plan that may be more acceptable to the planning commission. Second, you can challenge the decision in court if you have viable constitutional claims. Third, you can appeal the decision, in some cases, to the Zoning Board of Appeals if your community allows it.